KDV Dance Ensemble in Las Casas Invisibles at Funkhaus, Berlin. Photo © Jubal Battisti

REVIEW

KDV Dance Ensemble: Las Casas Invisibles

Read Icon Read
Time Icon Pink 2 min read
KDV Dance Ensemble in Las Casas Invisibles at Funkhaus, Berlin. Photo © Jubal Battisti
S pink identity
Emily May
A new company are the first contemporary dance show to headline at Berlin’s iconic electronic music venue Funkhaus

As a cast of ten dancers in ripped, blood-red catsuits descend into the darkened, misty arena of Funkhaus’ main hall, hopes are high for the inaugural performance of the newly formed KDV Dance Ensemble, spearheaded by Puerto Rican choreographer Kianí del Valle. As the first contemporary dance show to headline an iconic Berlin electronic music venue – located in a former GDR radio station – and with music by renowned artists Floating Points, Loctic and Raven, Las Casas Invisibles set itself up to be a unique event in Berlin’s cultural landscape, marrying the city’s rich worlds of modern dance and club culture.

Loosely described as an exploration of ‘constant migration’ and ‘the feeling of never arriving’, Las Casas Invisibles has little connecting thread aside from its continual display of intense emotional trauma. Desperate reaches, repetitive pulses, and phalanxes of dancers performing jolting movements in unison – as well as an out of place duet of dancers giggling maniacally while performing movements reminiscent of childhood clapping games and hopscotch – feel like clichéd attempts at presenting extreme emotion, and come off as inauthentic.

Del Valle does, however, come into her own in her inventive use of space. Presumably influenced by her background choreographing for galleries and museums (she has presented work in the Serpentine and the Barbican in London as well as Copenhagen Contemporary), she makes the most of every nook and cranny. Throughout, dancers traverse different levels of the wooden amphitheatre, squeeze themselves through audience members, and adopt seductive poses in alcoves.

Other impressive moments include a standout solo by Alvin Collantes. Intricately articulating his body, he flings his limbs at irregular intervals so that they pierce the air in time to the light-saber-like swipes in the music. However, on the whole, the cast’s aggressive shakes, crashes to the floor and histrionic screams married with distressed facial expressions, verge on torture porn. It leads me to question: why are so many contemporary dance shows obsessed with showcasing bodies in pain?

The bottom line: A melodramatic production presenting suffering for the sake of it
Location Icon
Funkhaus, Berlin, Germany
Publication Icon

Choreographer, director: Kianí del Valle / Music: Raven, Floating Points, Lotic / Assistant choreographer: Jacob Yaw / Dancers: Sebastian Abarbanell, Marcus Louend, Alvin Collantes, Thomas Rohe, Annalise Van Even, Shannon Leypoldt, Ruben Nsue, Sofia Ndaba, Ya-Chin Tsai, Maya Gomez / Lighting: Michael Titze / Rehearsal director: Amit Preisman / Studio manager: Elizabeth Hinojos / Stylist: Olive Duran / Assistant stylist: Fanny Kuebler / Makeup: Servullo Mendez/ Hair: Fatima, Kosuke Ikeuchi / Produced by: Box Artist Management